Stocks

Another Sub Prime Auto Lender Setting Up For A Short

Yesterday, I wrote a post about Santander Consumer,

Santander Consumer Is Setting Up For A Short Position

Santander Consumer is one of the largest subprime auto lenders in the market. Delinquencies for auto loans in general, including both prime and subprime, have reached their highest levels this year since 2011.

Santander Consumer had $26.3 billion of subprime auto loans as of June 30 that it either owned, or bundled into bonds, According to a report from S&P Global Ratings, Santander Consumer has more than $25 billion in subprime auto loans which is almost 50% of the company’s total managed loans.

Today, I want to introduce another auto lender, Credit Acceptance Corporation

Credit Acceptance Corporation provides financing programs, and related products and services to independent and franchised automobile dealers in the United States. The company advances money to dealers in exchange for the right to service the underlying consumer loans; and buys the consumer loans from the dealers and keeps various amounts collected from the consumers.

Don Foss is known as the pioneer of the subprime auto loan market.  Back in the days, General Motors and Ford would only lend money to folks with good credit.  So Don started selling cars on credit to people with shaky finances.  Don was charging customers crazy high interest rates and could because nobody else was issuing loans to this particular population with bad credit. So in 1972, Foss founded Credit Acceptance (CACC) to handle financing and debt collection for his used car business. Today, CACC is a major player in the U.S. subprime auto loan market and its market cap is a little under $8 billion.

Credit Acceptance Corporation’s CACC third-quarter 2019 earnings of $8.73 per share missed the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $9.13. However, the bottom line was up 12.6% year over year. 

Provision for credit losses increased 37.9% from the year-ago quarter to $19.3 million. Moreover, allowance for credit losses at the end of the third quarter was $509.1 million, up from $461.9 million as of Dec 31, 2018.

Credit Acceptance is well poised for growth in revenues, given the continued rise in consumer loans. However, persistently increasing expenses and deteriorating asset quality are near-term concerns.

Source

So as the economy slows, companies hire less and layoff more, customers’ confidence decline, the more sub-prime auto loans default.  And when this chain reaction fully materializes, CACC’s stock will crash. 

At the moment, there is a nice band of support/resistance at the $450 level.

However, because this band of support/resistance was breached last month, the chart suggests to short price at the weekly supply at $460.

This post is my personal opinion. I’m not a financial advisor, this isn't financial advise. Do your own research before making investment decisions.

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